#ESA2013 Ignite: Open Science

I had sooooo much fun organizing my first Ignite talk session. I would do it again in a heartbeat. I met several excellent people and learned a lot about data, R and collaboration tools. I am also super proud of how awesome my speakers and moderator are, and how thoughtful and stimulating the discussion was.

So I’m sharing it all like a proud session mama. Here are the session details from the program and, when available, the talks themselves:

Sharing Makes Science Better

Organizer: @sandramchung | Moderator: @jacquelyngill

Scientists too often labor alone. The need to closely guard ideas during the race to immortalize them in professional publications can make the practice of science crushingly lonely and ill-informed by tools and knowledge that could make science easier and better. Occasional scientific meetings are often the only opportunities to share ongoing work and connect with colleagues outside of one’s immediate working environment. But there’s a fertile online science ecosystem of innovation, collaboration and mutual support that carries on all year round, and its lifeblood is a network of scientists and science lovers who openly share tools, data, knowledge and ideas that help all researchers to do stronger, better, faster science. The rapidly growing open source and online science communities suggest a new model of doing science in which we build our work on tools, data, knowledge and ideas that are freely offered and contribute our own in return. This session features several free and open-source tools that ecologists have created specifically to help fellow researchers do the work of ecological science, as well some other tools we didn’t create but have tried and found enormously useful. We encourage our colleagues to try them, improve upon them, and perhaps most importantly, share what they’ve learned so that others can benefit as they have.

IGN 2-1

Big Data in Ecology

| @ethanwhite, Biology, Utah State University, Logan, UT

  • Slides and text
  • Increasingly large amounts of ecological and environmental data are available for analysis. Using existing data can save time and money, allow us to address otherwise intractable problems, and provide general answers to ecological questions. I will discuss why we should be actively using this data in ecology, how to get started, and give examples of what can be accomplished if we embrace an era of big data in ecology.

    IGN 2-2

    EcoData Retriever – automates the tasks of fetching, cleaning up, and storing available data sets

    | @bendmorris, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC

    Ecology often relies on data that has already been collected, and an ever-increasing amount of biological and environmental data is now available online. However, it can be difficult and time consuming to compile synthetic datasets from data files stored in various online repositories or research web sites. The EcoData Retriever is a community-centered tool that automates discovering, cleaning up, and organizing ecological data into the format of your choice. I’ll speak about problems solved by the Retriever and touch on future directions aimed at further utilizing community effort and the web to automate ecological data access.

    IGN 2-6

    R-based tools for open and collaborative science

    | @recology_ (Scott A. Chamberlain), Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology MS 170, Rice University, Houston, TX

    Open science is the practice of making the elements of scientific research – methods, data, code, software, results, and publications – readily accessible to anyone. While this has great potential for advancing research, the absence of an open science toolkit prevents open science from being more widespread. We are building bridges between data (e.g, Dryad) and literature (e.g., PLoS journals) repositories and the open source R software, a programming environment already familiar to many ecologists. These bridges facilitate open science by bringing together data acquisition, manipulation, analysis, visualization, and communication into one open source, open science toolkit.

    IGN 2-7

    Social media for scientific collaboration

    | @sandramchung, NEON Inc.

    Sharing Makes Science Better: Social Media for Ecologists from Sandra M Chung on Vimeo.

    Scientific research is about the nurturing of knowledge and ideas. And to knowledge- and idea-lovers, the Internet is a door to an infinite candy store. Social media provide a means to quickly access exactly the online knowledge you want – by filtering the grand store of information through interaction with the people, topics and communities that matter to you. I wouldn’t stop at just knowledge consumption, however. Sharing your science online can connect you with mentors and collaborators, sharpen and deepen your science, hone your communication and teaching skills, and even earn you funding.

    IGN 2-9

    The power of preprints: the open publication project for ecologists

    | @cjlortie, Biology, York University, Toronto, Canada

    Ideas are free but not cheap. Peer-reviewed publications are still the major form of accepted dissemination of ecological ideas. Even with open access however, this communication modality is outdated. Discussion, feedback, transparent review, versioning, ranking, and articulation of both idea development and peer-review are needed to accelerate scientific discovery. A new communication venue is proposed herein: archival of open access pre-prints similar to arXiv but with annotation, review, and discussion. Think stackoverflow + arXiv for ecologists; not a final step in the evolution of scientific communication but an affordable idea we need to explore.

    Leave a Reply