MOOCs are not the end of education; they are a game changer

What do you folks think of this? http://t.co/XWOfiql5MV @sciencegeekgirl @profdesai @sandramchung — Dave Moore (@DJPMoore) July 26, 2013 Some teachers are brilliant and talented coaches and mentors. But there’s still way too much focus on information delivery in higher education that just doesn’t make sense in an era when so much information is already freely … Continue reading MOOCs are not the end of education; they are a game changer

How to make non-scientists hate scientists and ignore science

Inspired by Brendan Leonard’s “How to Get Your New Boyfriend/Girlfriend to Hate Your Sport”. 1. Place all the blame for everyone else’s inability to understand or appreciate your work on inadequate science education. You shouldn’t have to change the way you communicate with people of different academic background from you. No one is going to … Continue reading How to make non-scientists hate scientists and ignore science

We are the seeders of collaboration clouds

This is a ScienceOnline-inspired ditty, written with the other sciosatellite leaders and Bora, Karyn and Anton in mind: We nudge the primordial specks of the universe, Atoms upon atoms Closer, closer Till gravity seizes them, draws them into intimate quarters, And together, they birth bright stars and galaxies. We fine-tune the sequence of amino acids … Continue reading We are the seeders of collaboration clouds

Managing social media accounts for public or private organizations. Part I: Must Know

#ESA2012 social media workshop from Sandra Chung I promised the attendees of my ESA 2012 Portland workshop that I’d address social media management on behalf of institutions/organizations. Here it is. This is version 1.0, so please comment if you have anything to add or if you think I’ve goofed! A bit of background: I currently … Continue reading Managing social media accounts for public or private organizations. Part I: Must Know

How do you respond to the charge that something is “dumbed down”?

As a science communicator and ex-science teacher, the most common criticism I hear from academic scientists about my work is that it’s “dumbed down.” I just read the same phrase in this fascinating but infuriating account in PLoS ONE of the results of a survey of biologists and physicists about science outreach. I had such … Continue reading How do you respond to the charge that something is “dumbed down”?

Yet another blog post about talking about climate

But this one leads to a chain of interesting pieces by some of my favorite authors about how to make a tired, important topic interesting again. Bob Krulwich writes: Global warming is important, yes; controversial, certainly; complicated (OK by me); but somehow, even broaching this subject makes me feel like someone’s put heavy stones in … Continue reading Yet another blog post about talking about climate