Latin for “testicles”

From a NYTimes interview with Katie Couric, “Katie Couric Has a Few Regrets“:

At your first job at CNN, the head of the network, Reese Schonfeld, famously said you just didn’t possess the gravitas to be in TV news.
Which I think is Latin for “testicles” by the way. But to give this some perspective: I was 23 years old.

For the 15 years you co-hosted “Today,” no one seemed capable of writing about you without using one particular descriptor. Tell me about your current relationship with the word “perky.”
It used to bother me because I thought there was a sexist undertone to that word. It meant shallow and cute, but not somebody who had any depth. It did become a pejorative word, but listen, it’s better than “bitchy.”

-Andrew Goldman

Tsunamis and the energy of atomic bombs

Despite the title, this is not about the shaky state of several nuclear power plants in post-tsunami Japan. Rather, I want to fawn over Kenneth Chang’s piece, The Destructive Power of Water (NYT 12 Mar 2011). An excerpt:

A typical bathtub holds 40 gallons or so of water. That is 330 pounds. A cubic yard of it, filling what at first glance seems a modest volume of 3 feet by 3 feet by 3 feet, weighs nearly 1,700 pounds, as much as the Smart micro car.

And when water is moving at 30 or 40 miles an hour, like the tsunami that inundated northern Japan on Friday, the heaviness of water turns deadly. Imagine 1,700 pounds hitting you at that speed, and each cubic yard of water as another 1,700 pounds bearing down on you. The destructiveness of a tsunami is not just one runaway car, but a fleet of them.

Explanatory science writing at its best. I love, love, love coming up with these kinds of dimensional reference points so that people really get what I’m talking about (Chang, by the way, is an alumnus of the same SciCom program at UCSC that I just finished last year). One of the professors cited in the article estimates the energy of the tsunami was comparable to that of an atomic bomb. Except we’re talking about sheer mechanical destruction instead of harmful radiation. Unless you count the shaky nuclear reactors …

Maybe I shouldn’t be talking about atomic bomb equivalents hitting Japan.

The point is that water is heavy, and it packs a punch. And the idea brings to mind a director describing the filming of an iconic scene in the 1983 movie Flashdance. A huge bucket of water is dropped on Jennifer Beals’ chest while her character, a dancer, is auditioning. Skip to about 1:25 in this Irene Cara video to watch that moment:

You can see her bracing quite hard against the chair, and watch her torso recoil in slow motion at the impact. According to the director, the first time they tried it, they used a lot more water and pretty much crushed her. And it hurt. Like trying to drink from a firehose.

Apples to apples in interracial marriage

This is a follow-up on a NYTimes story, Black Women See Fewer Black Men at the Altar. The range and extremes in this cursory analysis of interracial marriage rates are pretty striking:

Of all 3.8 million adults who married in 2008, 31 percent of Asians, 26 percent of Hispanic people, 16 percent of blacks and 9 percent of whites married a person whose race or ethnicity was different from their own. Those were all record highs.

Well, since Asians are the smallest ethnic group of the four, just by sheer odds we should be marrying outside our race (‘marrying out’) more often than the other groups. But how many of the interracial marriages are due to preference and how many of them are what we would expect just by the numbers?

If your choice of whom to marry were completely independent of race, the chance that you’ll marry someone from another race would be about like the chance you’ll run into someone from that race on the street. If we take the U.S. Census Bureau data from 2004 (most contemporary survey with all four of the largest races), the single (not married or separated) population over age 15 is:

3.6% Asian
13.3% Hispanic
16.5% black, and
66.5% white.
So since 96 of every 100 single people (13.3+16.5+66.5 = about 96) in the States are not Asian, you’d expect about 96 of every 100 Asians to marry out.

But only 31 of each 100 did, so it looks like Asians show some tendency to marry each other (‘marry in’) more than they marry out. Let’s look at some ratios to see how the same-race preferences compare across the races:

intermarriage rates
race expected / actual = ratio
Asian
96.4 / 31 = 3.1
Hispanic 86.7 / 26 = 3.33
black 83.5 / 16 = 5.22
white 34.5 / 9 = 3.83

The higher the ratio, the more likely that race is to ‘marry in’. Asians are, again, the biggest miscegenators, but not by a lot. Blacks, on the other hand, are far more likely than the other racial groups to marry each other based on what we would expect from race-independent marriage. We can speculate on the contributing factors – prejudice, prison, education, age structure, other socioeconomics – but I don’t have any data to support or refute any of them for now.

By the way, in 2004, the percentage of each racial group married without separation:

Asians 61%
Hispanics 50%
blacks 34%
whites 57%.

Asians are almost twice as likely to be married as blacks.

[In a New York Jewish accent] Talk amongst yourselves.

WHERE I GOT MY NUMBERS:
In addition to the referenced NYT story, I pulled March 2004 Census Bureau Community Survey data from these sources:

http://www.census.gov/population/socdemo/race/api/ppl-184/tab2.html
http://www.census.gov/population/socdemo/hispanic/ASEC2004/2004CPS_tab2.1.html
http://www.census.gov/population/socdemo/race/black/ppl-186/tab2.html

From those tables I added the numbers of widowed, divorced, and never married to get the following numbers:

3,623,000 single asians >15 both sexes in March 2004
13,294,000 single hispanics >15 both sexes in March 2004
16,499,000 single blacks >15 both sexes in March 2004
66,408,000 single whites > 15 both sexes in March 2004
99,824,000 single people total in March 2004

The percentages of each racial group that are married are taken directly from the linked tables. Yes, I am leaving out Inuit/American Indian, Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders, as well as mixed-race. They account for, respectively, 0.8%, 0.14%, and 2.3% of the population, too small a percentage for the CB to have useful data on them.